2017 LTC/Non-LTC Convictions: SEXUAL ASSAULT PROH/PURPORT SPOUSE

Introduction

The purpose of this article is to compare crime statistics between Texas License to Carry (LTC) holders and non-LTC holders for sexual assault prohibitions (proh) and purport spouse for 2017. Sexual assault proh/purport spouse includes cases where a person is charged with intentionally or knowingly causing physical or sexual harm to or threatening sexual assault or intercourse with a married or cohabitating partner.

It is important to study the relationship between LTC holders and crime statistics as it may provide valuable insight into the law-abiding behavior of LTC holders and their potential contributions to public safety.

Crime Statistics among Texas LTC Holders

In 2017, there were 3 convictions of sexual assault proh/purport spouse among Texas LTC holders, which is 8% of the total 36 convictions for this crime category. Comparatively, there were 37 convictions of sexual assault proh/purport spouse among non-LTC holders, which is 92% of the total 36 convictions for this crime category.

Factors that may Contribute to the Difference in Crime Statistics between Texas LTC and Non-LTC Holders

There may be several factors that contribute to the difference in crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders. Some of these factors include background checks and eligibility requirements for obtaining an LTC, training and education for LTC holders, and the perception of risk and responsibility among LTC holders.

All applicants for an LTC must pass a background check, pass a written exam and short training course, and meet other eligibility requirements set in the Texas Administrative Code. This is likely to deter LTC holders from committing crimes, as they understand the consequences of not being law abiding.

In addition, many LTC holders receive additional training and education on the responsible use of firearms and the legal implications of improper use. This type of training and education may also contribute to the lower rate of criminal activity among LTC holders.

Finally, the perception of risk and responsibility associated with being an LTC holder may also contribute to the lower rate of criminal activity among LTC holders. LTC holders understand that they are legally responsible for their actions and may be more likely to act responsibly and avoid criminal activity.

Conclusion

This article compared crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders for sexual assault proh/purport spouse in 2017. The results found that LTC holders had a lower rate of criminal activity than non-LTC holders, with 8% of the convictions for this crime category compared to 92% for non-LTC holders. Factors that may have contributed to this difference include background checks and eligibility requirements for obtaining an LTC, training and education for LTC holders, and the perception of risk and responsibility among LTC holders.

The findings of this research have implications for the group with the higher percentage of convictions for sexual assault proh/purport spouse. It suggests that more stringent background checks and rigorous training and education courses may help to reduce criminal activity among non-LTC holders, thereby improving public safety overall.

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