2018 LTC/Non-LTC Convictions: AGG SEXUAL ASSLT CHILD

Introduction

The purpose of this article is to compare crime statistics between Texas License To Carry (LTC) and non-LTC holders for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child in 2018. Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child is defined as a felony in which a person intentionally or knowingly causes the penetration of the anus or sexual organ of a child by any means, including body parts or objects.

It is important to study the relationship between LTC holders and criminal activity because licensing authorities, members of the public, and gun control advocates all have different views on the potential risks or benefits of granting LTCs to citizens.

Crime Statistics Among Texas LTC Holders

In 2018, the total number of convictions for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child in Texas was 863. Of those 863 convictions, there were 17 convictions involving Texas LTC holders. This is a rate of 1.97% of the total convictions among LTC holders, compared to 98.03% among non-LTC holders.

Factors That May Contribute To The Difference In Crime Statistics Between Texas LTC And Non-LTC Holders

The relatively low percentage of convictions among LTC holders for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child may be due to several factors. First, the background checks and eligibility requirements for obtaining a license in Texas are designed to restrict access to convicted felons and those with certain mental health issues. Second, LTC holders must successfully complete training and education courses AND pass a competency exam prior to obtaining or renewing their license. These courses may make LTC holders more aware of the consequences of their actions regarding the use of firearms. Finally, the perception of risk and responsibility of owning and carrying a firearm may lead LTC holders to be more law-abiding citizens than non-LTC holders.

Conclusion

This article has examined the crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders for Aggravated Sexual Assault of a Child in 2018. The data showed that, while LTC holders made up a small percentage (1.97%) of the total convictions, non-LTC holders made up 98.03%. Several factors may contribute to this discrepancy, such as the background checks and eligibility requirements for obtaining a license, the training and education for LTC holders, and the perception of risk and responsibility among LTC holders.

The findings of this article may have implications for those who view LTC holders as a risk to public safety. The data suggests that LTC holders are not more likely to commit crimes than non-LTC holders, and may even be slightly less likely.

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