2021 LTC/Non-LTC Convictions: INJ CHILD/ELDERLY/DISABLED W/INT BODILY INJ

Introduction

This article is written with the purpose of comparing the crime statistics between Texas License to Carry (LTC) holders and non-LTC holders for Injury to a Child/Elderly/Disabled with Intent to Bodily Injury in 2021. Injury to a Child/Elderly/Disabled with Intent to Bodily Injury is defined as an intentional act of bodily harm with reckless disregard for the health and safety of another person. This article will analyze the importance of studying the relationship between LTC holders and crime statistics, the impact of background checks and eligibility requirements, training and education, and the perception of risk and responsibility among LTC holders on the difference in crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders.

Crime Statistics among Texas LTC Holders

The crime statistics for Injury to a Child/Elderly/Disabled with Intent to Bodily Injury among Texas LTC holders show that there were two convictions out of the total of 792,603 LTC holders. This accounts for a conviction rate of 0.25%. On the other hand, among non-LTC holders, there were 1258 convictions out of the total of 28,942,719 non-LTC holders. This accounts for a conviction rate of 4.35%.

Factors that may contribute to the difference in crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders

The difference in crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders may be attributed to the background checks and eligibility requirements for obtaining an LTC. Specifically, Texas requires applicants to go through a background check and to pass a test on use of force, among other requirements. This helps ensure that there is a measure of preparedness and responsibility among LTC holders. In addition, LTC holders undergo mandatory training and education. This exposure may help to further increase their awareness of responsible gun ownership. Furthermore, the perception of a heightened risk and responsibility that LTC holders may have due to the background checks and education mentioned above may also contribute to the lower crime statistic among LTC holders.

Conclusion

This article has provided evidence that Texas LTC holders are less likely to commit crimes than non-LTC holders. The difference in crime statistics between Texas LTC and non-LTC holders may be attributed to the background checks and eligibility requirements, training and education, and the perception of risk and responsibility among LTC holders. While the findings of this article may suggest that LTC holders are more law-abiding citizens than non-LTC holders, further analysis and research is needed to fully assess the implications of this finding.

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